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Cromarty Image Library

Jemimaville Village - 1908
The Cromarty Archive
Jemimaville Village - 1908

Although miss-spelt Jamimaville, this pic shows a number of shops in the hamlet.
Picture added on 05 February 2004
This picture is in the following groups
Jemimaville, Poyntzfield, Balblair and Resolis
Comments:
I remember Jimmy and Kathy Ferguson having a shop in jemimaville. Not sure if it was maybe the first building shown in picture or the second or possibly it was further back down street going out towards poynzfield. Also Jimmy Scotts Garage which I beleive is still running ??
Added by HAZEL PENDLE (NEE MACLEAN) on 21 September 2005
My grandmother Elizabeth Macdonald (nee Urquhart) lived in Jemmimaville before marrying John MacDonald the Ploughman on Lord Ross's Estate and lived at the Mains Cromarty, she sadly died in 1913 leaving my grandfather, 4 daughters, Elizabeth, Alexandra, Isabelle, Hughina and a son William who have now all passed away.
Added by Jean Bell on 31 March 2007
Amendment to my previous comment:
My grandmother Elizabeth Macdonald born 1871 in Jemimaville to William and Alexandrina Urquhart(nee Munro) sadly passed away on 1st January 1922 and not 1913 as previously stated. Information from the General Register of Scotland.
Added by Jean Bell on 25 April 2007
I find this picture of Jemimaville very interesting, my relations lived at Laurel cottage.
Added by Sandra Bell on 08 January 2009
Does anyone know if John McIntosh still owned one of these shops in Jemimaville in 1908. His Stepmother was Robertina Urquhart and I am Robertina's Great, great Granddaughter living in New Zealand
Added by Carolyn Sheehan on 24 April 2009
Do you remember the pumps where we all got our water until the seventies? There were three in all on the opposite site of the road to the shops. We had a little trolley and a plastic water carrier shaped like a milk churn with a plug and chain in the neck. Needless to say baths were few and far between.

Added by Gillie Lomax on 04 September 2009
I grew up in Jemimaville and I dont remember there being THREE water pumps in the village there was one at the east end towards the garage and the other one was at what was reffered to as the west end not far from the shop I never ever saw a third
Added by Mary Mackay now Tomlinson Harrison on 05 September 2009
Must be my mind playing tricks - I thought there was one in the middle. We always used the west end one.
Added by Gillie Lomax on 06 September 2009
Yes the second one was in the middle but there wasn't one at the Udale Pillars, remember them?
Added by Mary Mackay now Tomlinson Harrison on 07 September 2009
Udale pillars, were they the gates opposite Jimmy Scott's garage? Do you remember our famous authoress Elizabeth Cameron/Jane Duncan who lived in the village? She wrote the "My friend....." series.
Added by Gillie Lomax on 17 September 2009
I just found information that my gr uncle worked as a baker in a baking firm in the 1880s in Jamimaville. I realize that is a long time ago but does anyone have any information on the bakery? His name was John Munro and his family was in Saltburn.
Added by Susan Saloom on 22 July 2017
I lived in the house with the woman in black standing in front of it till around 1984, it was called Dale Villa. We then bought the smaller house behind it, not in the picture, and renovated it, it was called Seaview. Next to Seaview, again hidden, was a byre where we kept anthracite for the agar - it also was a stables with 2 or 3 stalls. We sold Dale Villa in 1985 and stayed in Seaview. My mum renovated the byre into a holiday cottage after I left in 1987. Next to Dale Villa, and towards the foreground lived 'Sandy', I remember him cutting the lawn with a scythe. Next to him were the lovely Doves, Roger and Maggie, with 5!! daughters. The oldest was my age. The first house that steps forward used to be owned by Agnes Thomas who was a nurse in Hiroshima post the second world war, a lovely lady. A couple of doors down was Richard the climber who was rated one of the UK's top 50 climbers of the century by climbing magazine. His wife Barbara and my mother are still good friends. Further down the village was the local Doctor, Charlie, and his son is still a good friend. At the far end of the village were the Scott's who owned the garage - again lovely people I've lost touch with. At the other end of the village was a shop but it closed in the late 80's early 90's. You could buy wellingtons in the original 50's boxes from it. The post office was in one of the Scott's houses, since I left a cute one has been plonked in the field. While I was there there was a 'tinker' (and I mean this in a kind way) called Charlie Cowboy who lived in a house at the back of Jemimaville without power or water. He got his water from the central water pump with would be located near the woman in black on the right hand side of the picture. He had the strongest Black Isle accent he new and a he had a good turn of phrase 'I'm so strong that if you tied a rope around the Black Isle I could pull it away'. He had a pony and dray and sometimes went off to visit.
Added by BC on 18 October 2017
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Jemimaville, Poyntzfield, Balblair and Resolis

Sheds at Newhall - c1901Building a shed at Newhall - c1898Jemimaville Village - c1920