We use cookies to track visitor statistics and personalise adverts. This info is shared with Google. Only use the site if you agree to this. OK, I agree

Cromarty Image Library

HMS Cromarty
The Cromarty Archive
HMS Cromarty

Bangor Class Minesweeper lunched 1941. She was sunk on 23rd October 1943 in the Straits of Bonificio, (Sardinia) ironically having struck a mine.

She was involved in the capture of an Italian submarine 'Bronzo' off the coast of Sicily in July 1943.
Picture added on 11 September 2004 at 11:22
Comments:
My Great Uncle served on the Cromarty, Leading Telegraphist William Jones, and went down with her on 23/10/43. I would appriciate it if anyone could give me more info, especially anyone who knew Bill.
Added by Mark Jones on 02 December 2004
Despite her short life, less than two years, HMS Cromarty, along with HMS Cromer, were described as the "outstanding ships of the gallant 14th Flotilla". She was sunk with the loss of 5 officers and 20 ratings. Her C/O was Commander C G Palmer, DSC & Bar, VRD, RNZNVR, MIS, a naval volunteer officer who was a company director from Auckland, NZ. He survived the sinking but spent a year in hospital. 61 other crew were believed to have survived.
Added by Campbell Ross on 25 May 2005
Whilst looking for details of HMS Cromarty, I came across a crew list for HMS Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar. The list includes a Robert Shadd (22) of Cromarty. He is described as a "landsman", which apparently means he was on his first sea trip. Now there's a story, if anyone can find out who he was!
He seems to have survived unscathed!
Added by Campbell Ross on 25 May 2005
My uncle also went down on the HMS Cromarty on 23.10.43. He was Melvin Edward O'Brien, age 22. He also served on HMS Drake and joined the Royal Navy at the age of 16 before the start of the second world war. The last contact the family had of Melvin was when his elder brother, Douglas, met him quite by accident in Tripoli a little while before his ship went down. I would be grateful for any information concerning his service in the Royal Navy.
Added by Melvin O'brien on 01 October 2006
My Brother Stanley Truelove also went down on 2 October 1943 aged 20. Any informtion would be appreciated
Added by Peyer Colin Truelove on 27 June 2008
My Father, Edmund (Ted) Povah was a Signalman aboard HMS Cromarty, fortunately he survived the mine that day. He subsequently went to New Zealand in the 90's and was reunited with his old skipper. He also provided information and photographs to the museum in Cromarty of the ship.
Added by John Edmund Povah on 15 March 2010
I came across this website while researching a presentation on my father's ship, HMS Seaham - a sister ship to the Cromarty and part of the 14th Minesweeping Flotilla.

My father, then Lieut. Commander Robert E. Brett, upon witnessing the mining of the Cromarty, navigated HMS Seaham into the minefield to pick up survivors. Leading Seaman, Paul Jasper who I interviewed in 1995, stated that mines were popping up during that sweeping operation like blackberries and only due to my father's superb navigating skills that they did not share the same fate as the Cromarty.Needless to say, Commander Palmer was picked up with the survivors, his legs badly mangled so that for the rest of his life he walked with a cane.My father being second in command of the flotilla then became senior officer of the group. For Captain Brett's efforts in this operation, he was awarded the DSC.

My father and Commander Palmer remained life long friends and frequently visited each other. I had the honor to correspond with him in 1996 when I was doing research on HMS Seaham.
Added by William R. Brett on 14 July 2010
I came across this web-site whilst searching for information about the Cromarty & was interested to see particularly the name Ted Povah.
My Dad William Smith(Bill) now 92, was also a signalman aboard the Cromarty. He was one of 3 signalmen when the ship was commissioned in 1941, Ronie Surman & Ted Povah where the other 2. My Dad was suffering a from a burst eardrum & was transfered to a hospital ship in Madagascar in May 1942. We repeatedly hear tales of my Dad's experiences during the war & he has often wondered if any of the crew survived. Whilst on holiday in Cromarty a few years ago we saw the photographs & information about the ship in the museum, & were told about the skipper who survived & went to live in New-Zealand. We wrote to his son & had a lovely letter back.
Added by Barbara McCormick on 01 August 2010
My Uncle was Ronald Surman. He died in Bolton Lancashire 1994 was married to my Aunt. They didnt have any children. He wouldn't talk much about his Naval History. All we know was that he was mentioned in dispatches in conection to HMS Cromarty and that he spent some time in hospital after the sinking.
Added by Frances Morgan on 09 August 2010
My Grandfather was Chief Stoker Harold Wyers. He was on HMS Cromarty when it sunk. He just happened to be on deck when the blast happened. He said he tossed off as many lifejackets out of the locker and the ship went down quickly. He and a group of survivors kept the Captain (who was injured) on a piece of debris. My Grandfather was mentioned in Despatch in the London Gazette 02MAY44 by order of the King for his actions that day.
Added by Rex Wyers on 03 August 2014
My father, Frank Lloyd, a "Tiffy" on board the sister ship, HMS Bangor, tells a somewhat different story in his memoirs to that of the son of Lieut. Commander Brett. My father states: We picked up survivors including the Captain who was badly injured. One difficult rescue was trying to get a lad away from a floating mine. In his shocked state he was clinging to anything that floated, so one of our lads swam over to him and had to punch him to get him away. On board, the seamans mess deck was cleared for the casualties and we all helped to clean up the survivors – the ships doctor telling us to scrub their wounds. I was working on a fellow with a large gash from his hip half way down to his knee. And gingerly cleaning this wound when the Doc said “scrub man”. I thought he was a sadist but after realised the sense in it.
Added by Dr Colin R Lloyd on 31 October 2014
HMS CROMARTY
My uncle Bernard Upton survived the sinking on 23 Oct 43. He was decorated for his actions that day.
He is almost 96 years old and still as sharp as a pin. He is writing his memoirs about WW2 including much about Cromarty. I will post again when the book is published.
Added by Richard James on 03 January 2015
My uncle James William Dickens was a ccok on the Cromarty and was killed on this sad day.
Added by Patricia Dickens on 31 August 2015
My uncle did not survive the sinking of the HMS Cromatry in 1943 his name was John Robert "Jackie" Moorfield from Orford, Warrington he was in his very early twenties and him never returning broke my grandparents hearts. Watching the laying of wreaths at the cenotaph today has made me curious as to whether any survivors still alive remember him?
Added by Penny Moorfield on 08 November 2015
Hi Penny,
I will ask my Uncle, Bernard Upton, who although he is 96 has a brilliant memory for names in World War 2. I will post when his book of memoirs is published.
Added by Richard James on 10 November 2015
It is with great sadness that I have to inform you that Lt Bernard Upton passed away yesterday, just short of his 97th birthday. He wrote a detailed report of the sinking of HMS CROMARTY a few days after the sinking. If anyone would like to see a copy of this, please let me know.
Added by Richard James on 23 April 2016
My Dad, (Norman J Hinchliffe) was a Chief Pretty Officer and served on the Cromarty. He corresponded with Captain Palmer for the rest of his life. Dad knew the captain as Bunty Palmer. Richard James, I also knew your uncle, I took my Mum to a reunion in Birmingham once and met him there. Mum wrote to him regularly. My Dad died in 1983.
If it's possible, I would be very interested in reading a copy of Bernard's report.
Added by Glenis Brindley (née Hinchliffe) on 08 July 2016
Hello Richard,I served 24 years in the Navy,having first being brought up in Cromarty,I still have relatives in the Crom,and buried my mother there recently. I would be very interested and privileged to read the detailed report please.
Added by Tony Fraser on 13 July 2016
Bernard Upton's book about the sinking of HMS Cromarty and the rest of his war was published on the Anniversary last week. If you would like to buy a copy for just £9.99 including P&P, please email info@bernardupton.co.uk with your postal address and payment details. Thank you.
Added by Richard James on 29 October 2017
Please add your comments about this picture using the form below.

Comments


Your Name


Your email address - this will be shown on the page and will allow the system to notify you of further comments added to this picture.




The Sea

HMS Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrierLegal challenge to STS oil plan to be launchedOfficial launch of Juniper, first Cromarty SkiffCromarty Firth Dolphins in danger - OBJECT'Renfrew Rose' ferry arrives in CromartyThe Fisher Town, CromartyMV ParidaT.S. Royalist in Cromarty HarbourThe Amazing Levitating TankerShore Path repairs, March 2014